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Thursday, April 23, 2015

Obama kills another American on foreign soil

U.S. President Barack Obama on Thursday apologized for a counterterrorism operation in January that accidentally killed two aid workers held hostage by al-Qaeda, American Warren Weinstein and Italian Giovanni Lo Porto.

“As a husband and as a father, I cannot begin to imagine the anguish that the Weinstein and Lo Porto families are enduring today,” Obama told reporters, with a deep sigh, saying he took responsibility for the deaths and has ordered a full review.

“I profoundly regret what happened,” Obama said, explaining he declassified some of the details of the operation so that the families could know what happened.

Another American al-Qaeda member, Adam Gadahn, also was killed, likely in a separate operation, the White House added.

Weinstein was abducted in Lahore, Pakistan, in 2011 while working for a U.S. consulting firm. Al-Qaeda had asked to trade him for members of the Islamist militant group being held by the United States.

Weinstein was seen in videos released in May 2012 December 2013, asking for Obama to intervene on his behalf and saying he was suffering from heart problems and asthma.

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Italian aid worker Lo Porto has been missing in Pakistan since January 2012.

The White House did not describe the operation, but the Wall Street Journal reported that it was a the first known instance in which the United States has accidentally killed a hostage in a drone strike.

Norman Rockwell Model dead at age 92

The model for Norman Rockwell’s iconic 1943 “Rosie the Riveter” painting has died.

Mary Doyle Keefe, 92, died Tuesday in Simsbury, Conn., after a brief illness, according to her family.

The famed image symbolized the millions of American women who went to work during World War II.

The iconic 1943 "Rosie the Riveter" poster.HANDOUT/REUTERS
The iconic 1943 "Rosie the Riveter" poster.

Keefe grew up in Arlington, Vt., where she met Rockwell and posed for his painting when she was a 19-year-old telephone operator. The painting graced the cover of the Saturday Evening Post on May 29, 1943.

It shows a red-haired Rosie in blue jean work overalls sitting down, with a sandwich in her left hand, her right arm atop a lunchbox with the name “Rosie” on it, a rivet gun on her lap and her feet resting on a copy of Adolf Hitler’s manifesto “Mein Kampf.”